Blogs

Posted by: Harold Spencer, Jr. | March 24, 2014

hspencer77:

Great blog discussing how to use Motherbrain, Chef and Eucalyptus.

Originally posted on Testing Clouds at 128bpm:

Introduction

Installing distributed systems can be a tedious and time consuming process. Luckily there are many solutions for distributed configuration management available to the open source community. Over the past few months, I have been working on the Eucalyptus cookbook which allows for...

Posted by: Vic Iglesias | March 24, 2014

 

Introduction

Installing distributed systems can be a tedious and time consuming process. Luckily there are many solutions for distributed configuration management available to the open source community. Over the past few months, I have been working on the Eucalyptus cookbook which allows for standardized deployments of Eucalyptus using Chef. This functionality has already been implemented in MicroQA using individual calls to Knife (the Chef command line interface) for each machine...

Posted by: Tim Zeller | March 20, 2014

On the surface, the costs of public cloud computing are inexorably going down, making it a more attractive for many organizations. But, as I've noted before, accurately assessing cloud TCO is a difficult process that must account for performance, not just price and speed. Many organizations can improve their cloud economics by shifting some workloads to private infrastructure.

What's Happening with Public Cloud Prices?

Are organizations really reaping operational and economic...

Posted by: Tim Zeller | March 18, 2014

Eucalyptus vice president of community and product Greg DeKoenigsberg recently spoke to Open Source Delivers about the current state and future of cloud adoption, as well as APIs, Amazon Web Services and the robust rate of contribution to open source cloud ecosystems. Eucalyptus has benefited from the gaining momentum of the private cloud, which has become increasingly popular as organizations look to control overall IT expenses, maintain compliance and increase agility across development,...

Posted by: Colby Dyess | March 17, 2014

Web applications have come a long way in a short time. In the past, software was often quickly developed and launched, but its bugs weren't ironed out until after the fact, due to the tediousness of most testing procedures. Developers and testers had to click around an application to find bugs, but by the time that they had discovered the main problems, they might already be on the verge of having to add new features that would in turn require additional screening and troubleshooting.

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